english ı german

  • Introduction
  • Keiin Yoshimura
  • Visual Impressions
  • Keiin in Kerala
  • Exploring New Shores
  • NAGOYAOBI - A Workshop
  • ... Continued
  • Repertoire
  • The Stories
  • CONTACT

Kamigata-Mai (Jiuta-mai)

- a traditional Japanese dance form

Osaka,  Kyoto and Kobe were known as the Kamigata area, so the dances created here are called Kamigata-mai.

Drawing on 12th-century traditions established by courtesan dancers and singers at banquets in Kyoto and namely based on the dancing tradition of noh, kabuki  and kyogen, but also referring to the techniques of puppet movements in bunraku, it was born and developed in the 16th century.

Kamigata-mai  is at times called jiuta-mai, because it is performed to the accompaniment of jiuta (popular song sung by the Kamigata people), the oldest form of shamisen music.

While noh, kyogen and bunraku as well are performed by males, kamigata-mai origins in the dances popular with the court ladies, "Maiko" or "Geisha".

Developed mainly as a chamber art, it was performed in zashiki  (a Japanese-style room with tatami mats)   to entertain special guests. That is why at times it is also called "zashiki-mai".  It enjoyed the patronage of highly aesthetically sensitive personalities.

As a chamber art, kamigata-mai exhibits a sharp contrast to world-famous kabuki dances which are put on in large theatres to the accompaniment of nagauta which is theatre-oriented music.

 

Kamigata-mai is performed in a subdued, tranquil and dignified way, giving major importance to the external expression's of one's innermost sentiments.  kabuki dances instead are more animated, vigorous and sometimes even boisterous.

 

SEE AN ANIMATED CLIP ABOUT KAMIGATA-MAI

 

LINK: Japanese Art Forms - An Overview

For more information about Japanese culture the following organisations are of help: Japan Information Network (JIN), Japan Center for Intercultural Communication (JCIC) and The Japan Foundation. They are all linked through Web Japan, a 'Gateway for all Japanese Information'. Here you will find a short and comprehensive Overview of JapaneseDance and an Overview of Japanese Music.

The following tabs feature one of the leading artists of kamigata-mai, Keiin Yoshimura, who has repeatedly visited India.

With the kindly given permission and when emphasized, the material of the below links is compiled from the following web site: http://www.kamigatamaitomonokai.org

Keiin Yoshimura

A performer, choreographer and art director of Kamigata-mai dance, Tokyo Japan
Director of Kamigatamaitomonokai Organization
Head of Yoshimura Keiin Kamigata-mai Studio
Keiin Yoshimura is an outstanding and leading artist of kamigata-mai.

Keiin Yoshimura

Keiin Yoshimura performing Kamigata-Mai

Keiin Yoshimura
... to the lingering sound of the shamisen

Kamigata-mai is pure poetry translated into dance and music within an unfolding meditative space.

Keiin YOSHIMURA uses dance to express the whole range of innermost feelings of a woman based on this traditional Japanese dance style. She translates them into slow, earth bound movements, accentuating them and adding more expression by using small objects like a folding fan or parasol or the kimono sleeve.
the kimono itself symbolizes the beauty of the dance.

The jiuta singer, representing the popular folk song tradition of the Kamigata region and accompanying herself on the shamisen, the three string instrument that creates with it's sawari (buzzing) sound a sensory space, adds to an atmosphere of a highly stylized reflection of emotions in the boundless space of time.

 

 

body postures

colors - light - space impressions

Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura
Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura

costume - gestures - body language

Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura
Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura

SEE AS AN ANIMATED CLIP

Keiin Yoshimura during a stay in Kerala

Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura
... dressed in 'Kerala style', posing before the Kerala Sahitya Akademi and the Shaktan Thampuran palace ...
Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura
... during one of her visits to the 'cultural capital of Kerala', Thrissur

Keiin Yoshimura's Arangettam in Mohiniyattam on February 14th, 2003

An Arangettam means the first public performance after the initial years of training in an art form. During one of her stays in Kerala, Keiin studied the aesthetics of Kerala's unique Indian 'Devadasi' art form, Mohiyattam under Nirmala Panicker, Natanakaisiki, Irinjalakuda, an organisation devoted to research and production of Mohiniyattam.

 

Keiin Yoshimura

 

Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura
Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura

A demonstration of the Japanese classical dance form Kamigata-mai [NAGOYAOBI]

on February 17th 2003 in the 'Nalukkettu' Cherpu, the former Alakkattu Mana.
Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura

[NAGOYAOBI]  depicts the subtle emotions, state of mind and thus social situation of a Geisha, who cannot be with her lover.

Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura
 

CONTINUED: A demonstration of the Japanese classical dance form Kamigata-mai [NAGOYAOBI]
Link to photos from a Nagoyaobi performance in Japan

Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura Keiin Yoshimura

Repertoire

Dance form
Title
Jiuta
[Aoi no uye] [Aoi no uye] [Humiduki] [Kanawa] [Kanegamisaki]  [Kawazu] [Kiku no tsuyu]  [Kodoujiyouji] [Kosu no to] [Mizu-kagami] [Mushi no ne] [Naginata-Yashima] [Nagoyaobi] [Nezuminomichiyuku] [Shouiyo] [Takenoen] [Tamatoriama] [Utou] [Yachiyojisi] [Yashima] [Yuki]
Yamatogaku
[Shikinohana]
Ogie
[Kanayatanzen]
Gidayuu
[Hanakurabe Shikinokotobuki] [Shaberi-Yamanba] [Kaminari]
Nagauta
[Shigure-Saigyo]
Kamigatauta
[Fumizuki] [Sangokuichi]
Icchyubushi
[Matsunohagoromo]
Creative Dance
[Terute] [Gokuraku-Kinngyo]
Utai & Jiuta
[Kibune]
Occidential & Noh Music
[Yukisagi]

Details Of Some Jiuta Dance Figures

  • Jiuta Title
    Composer
    Instruments
    Text
  • [Aoi no uye]
    YAMADA kengyô
    voice, koto, shamisen
    Yôkyoku
  • [Kanawa]
    FUJIO kôtô
    voice, shamisen
    Yôkyoku
  • [Kawazu]
    unknown
    voice, shamisen
    unknown
  • HIROHASHI kôtô
    voice, shamisen, koto
    FUKUSHIN
  • MINEZAKI kôtô
    voice, shamisen, kokyû
    Kubinobu
  • [Mushi no ne]
    FUJIO kôtô
    voice, shamisen
    ("Matsumushi", Yôkyoku)
  • YAMAMOTO Kiichi
    voice, shamisen, koto
    ARASHI San'emon
  • [Nezumi no michiyuku]
    unknown
    voice, shamisen
    (TOMIYAMA Seikin)
  • [Yachiyojisi]
    unknown
    voice, shamisen, koto, kokyû
    SONOHARA
  • [Yashima]
    FUJIO kôtô
    voice, shamisen, koto
    (Yôkyoku)
  • [Yuki]
    MINEZAKI kôtô
    voice, shamisen, shakuhachi
    RYUSEKIAN Hazumi

Some titles are linked to Keiin Yoshimura's photo gallery

Content Of Some Dance Titles

 

  • dance form
    title
    content
  • Jiuta 
    [Aoi no uye], Lady Aoi
    A classic work by 15th-century Japanese dramatist Zeami MotokiyoThe play, based on events in the 11th-century novel "The Tale of Genji," by Murasaki Shikibu In this play, Lady Aoi, represented by a folded robe, lies near death, stricken with a mysterious illness by the malevolent spirit of the scorned, jealous Lady Rokujo. The play's most memorable scene involves an exorcism performed by a chanting ascetic whose incantations stay the evil spirit of Rokujo. Rokujo repeatedly withdraws, coils and strikes until in the end her heart softens and she is guided to salvation and Buddhahood.
  • Jiuta
    [Kanawa] 
    Narrates how a woman, enraged by jealousy, goes to the Kibune Shrine and petitions the gods to turn her into a demon so that she can have revenge
  • Jiuta
    It is a short amatory story set in summer: a woman has fallen in love with a man who eased her stomach pains with his strong arms. They are about to hang a mosquito net together.Outside the bamboo blind
  • Jiuta
    [Mitsukagami], The Water-mirror
     
  • Jiuta
    Depicts the subtle emotions, state of mind and thus social situation of a Geisha, who cannot be with her lover.
  • Jiuta
    [Yashima] Yashima (an ancient battle place)
    The dance is based upon the Noh play also titled Yashima. In it a single dancer tries to capture the essence of the ancient battle that took place at Yashima. One spring day, a traveling priest visits the site of the old battle at Yashima located next to a beautiful beach with the crystal blue sea on one side and rising mountains on the other. It was here that the Heike and Genji clans fought for supremacy. The story unfolds with the priest meeting the ghost of the Genji general, Minamoto no Yoshitsune, who recounts his battles with the enemy warriors. All through the night, he narrates of his great courage and bravery in the battle and his finally victory over his foes, and as the day dawns the ghost fades away. Among Kamigata-mai, it is one of the most strenuous and active dance performance.
  • Jiuta
    [Yuki], snow
    Yuki is one of the most popular jiuta dances. It depicts the tranquil mind of a nun and her sad psyche before becoming a nun. The text tells the story of a Buddhist nun who has lived in a nunnery, apart from the world, ever since she was disappointed being in love while she was a young courtesan. The piece beautifully depicts the serenity of the mind of the woman, as the tolling of a temple bell in the snow reminds her of her past sorrows. The instrumental interlude (ai-no-te) is used here to express the quiet tolling of a distant temple bell on a snowy evening and has become so popular that its melancholic melody is often used in other dances as a kind of theme to suggest a snowy scene or the call for a cold, dark atmosphere.
  • Kamigatauta
    [Sangokuichi]
    Once there was a rich, licentious man. Although he had already gotten married, he fell in love with a young and beautiful girl. After they came to love each other, she went on a pilgrimage with her elderly mother, because she realized how guilty their act was. After hearing this he went running after her while leaving his pregnant wife alone. Being left to ponder why he had left her, the wife assumed it was because of her unfortunate facial appearance, leaving her with a sense of self regret. A classic work by 15th-century Japanese dramatist Zeami MotokiyoThe play, based on events in the 11th-century novel "The Tale of Genji," by Murasaki Shikibu
    In this play, Lady Aoi, represented by a folded robe, lies near death, stricken with a mysterious illness by the malevolent spirit of the scorned, jealous Lady Rokujo. The play's most memorable scene involves an exorcism performed by a chanting ascetic whose incantations stay the evil spirit of Rokujo. Rokujo repeatedly withdraws, coils and strikes until in the end her heart softens and she is guided to salvation and Buddhahood.

Some titles are linked to Keiin Yoshimura's photo gallery

   

 

 

Contact Us

We are always happy to hear from you.
If you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact us by using the form below.
We'll get back to you soon.

 

 

A value is required.Minimum number of characters not met.Exceeded maximum number of characters.

 

A value is required.Invalid format.Minimum number of characters not met.Exceeded maximum number of characters.

 

Invalid format.

 

Invalid format.

 

 A value is required.Minimum number of characters not met.Exceeded maximum number of characters.